Directory of International and Comparative Law & Courts Scholars

Under construction!

If you would like to be added or removed, or would like to revise your information, please email me at rareid@utep.edu.

Abigail Hassett

Her research broadly examines judicial ambition, seeking to both define and quantify this complicated measure. Decades of judicial research assumes that ambition exists, but fails to break down how this phenomenon interacts with or creates other facets of judicial behavior. By furthering our understanding of why and how people seek to become judges, we are better able to understand judicial behavior as a whole. She also studies international courts and criminal prosecutions.

Twitter: @avhassett
Website: https://avhassett.wordpress.com
Email: ahassett@email.sc.edu

Adam Chilton

His primary research interests lie at the intersection of international law, comparative law, and empirical legal studies. His research includes mixed methods approaches to examining whether including rights in constitutions improves protection of human rights, documenting the development and enforcement of competition law regimes around the world, studying how bilateral labor agreements can be used to promote international labor migration, and researching how to improve the quality of life in India’s slums. In addition to these international and comparative projects, Adam researches the ideology of the American legal profession, judicial decision making, and how to improve the legal academy.

Twitter: @adamschilton
Website: http://www.adamchilton.org
Email: adamchilton@uchicago.edu

Alex Schwartz

His research focuses on comparative constitutional law, judicial politics and judicial behavior. Some of his previous work has been about constitutional courts in divided societies, including Bosnia, Northern Ireland, Europe, and Asia. More recently Alex has been researching court curbing, particularly when associated with populist politics.

Twitter: @AlexDSchwartz
Website: https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=P0e2ykoAAAAJ&hl=en
Email: schwartz@hku.hk

Alexander Hudson

His research focuses on constitution-making processes, constitutional referenda, comparative constitutionalism, and comparative judicial behavior. In particular, his interests include the effects of public and political party participation in constitution-making processes and minority rights, such as those in Iceland, South Africa, and Brazil.


Website: aehudson.com
Email: hudson.alexander@gmail.com

Alice J. Kang

Her research focuses on women, gender, and politics with a world regional focus on Africa. Specifically, she investigates the role of women’s movements and conservative movements in making women’s rights policy in Niger and traces the rise of women judges on high courts globally. She also examines the effects of external threats on gender bias, women legislative representation, and litigation on women’s rights.

Twitter: @kangalicej
Website: https://sites.google.com/site/alicejkang/about-me?authuser=0
Email: akang2@unl.edu